Thursday, 30 January 2014 22:07 UTC

I have been asked for advice on how to wade through the masses of information available online to developers. Every day there is something new and everybody wants your time, vendors try to convince you that their products are the best and will live forever then dump a product shortly after (cough cough silverlight cough cough). So how can one make sense of this huge mass of information?

First of all, filter. I can’t stress this enough: a fast-paced industry like ours leads to technologies and frameworks being born and dying almost on a daily basis (I am looking at you, JavaScript frameworks). Following every trend is like drinking from the firehose and would drive anyone crazy over a longer period of time. There are exceptions to this rule, obviously: before knowing what to filter out, you want to find out what you are interested in, so it makes sense to look around occasionally.

Prioritize. When you have a set of technologies and concepts you are interested into, you need to start somewhere. The high priority items on the list are the ones that are being adopted right now by the rest of the industry, if you are lucky, and the ones that have been adopted since forever, if you are working on a hardcore legacy project.

Pace yourself. There is no need to sprint, we’re here for the long run. Choose a comfortable pace at which you can learn and try to stick to it.

Create routines. Make learning part of your daily routine. My news aggregator helps me in giving me my daily dose of what’s happening around the world. As discussed previously, filtering the news you are getting served every day is the only way to remain sane when it comes to your news feeds. Pick a few high quality sources to maintain a high signal-to-noise ratio.

Get involved in the community. Online or offline, conferences or forums, Stackoverflow, nowadays you have lots of possibilities to get in touch with passionate developers. Learn and teach, attend to and give talks, whatever your time allows for, interacting with other developers can be very rewarding. And I know that in Europe we shun it, but Twitter can have its uses.

Everything until now is fine and dandy, but a bit abstract. A way to concretize it is using ThoughtWorks technology radar. The radar allows you to both filter and prioritize technologies and techniques you are interested into, therefore deciding your level of commitment to them.

The implementation might look complicated, but it is really quite simple. You have four categories called Techniques, Tools, Platforms and Language & Frameworks. Each category is subdivided into four layers defining the relevance to the industry of the topics, which go from “hold off for now” to “this technology should be used in modern software development”. The idea is to regularly keep track of what’s on your radar and modify it as you grow, guiding your learning choices. For more details here you can find information on how to build your own technology radar.

If you are staring at an empty news aggregator, here is a selection of some of the sources I have in my feed in no particular order:

How are you keeping up with technology?



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